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Battery and metal detectors

Nowadays, detectors have integrated batteries, is it good or bad, and how to care for this type of solution? Find out in the article below.

Modern power sources are already mostly integrated into the device. Field exchange is not possible. For some, it’s a disadvantage, because you have to remember to charge before going out, on the other hand, going for replaceable batteries in the middle of nowhere can often be completely futile, and we don’t always remember to take or check spare ones. The disadvantage can also be the number of charging devices. Such XP DEUS has a link in the probe, wireless headphones, and in the RC control panel … it’s a lot, although there is always an alternative, if the headphones are discharged, we have a panel and a loudspeaker, if vice versa, only headphones, and limited settings options.

You can always take a power bank with you or recharge it in the car, but it also takes time. Both solutions have some disadvantages, but what about the durability of such internal batteries? This is where electronics come in handy. Internal circuits manage the charging cycle. The service life is several hundred or more cycles, so it will be enough for some time, and the manufacturer provides for replacement, which can be done on your own or commissioned to the service.

How to charge? As I mentioned above, everything is managed by electronics, and the power of the charger affects only the time of the process itself. The USB standard reigns, so the matter is simple, we are looking for a connector or a charger. For your own safety, it is worth taking care of a good quality solution. YouTube is full of videos of spectacular fires of cheap USB chargers!

The detectors have charging indicators and the process itself takes a few hours, but what is the best way to check if the detector is charged when there is no such indicator or it does not work properly? In a very simple way. We touch the charger. Cold means the process is finished, warm means that we have to wait a little longer.

How often should we charge our detector? After every exit? Always connected? How to store?! The principle is simple. We discharge to 20% not to the end, so as not to burden the cell thermally, overheating drastically shortens its life. Charge to 80-100% capacity. During storage, the battery should not be more than 80% and less than 20%. It’s always worth checking. We will avoid problems in the future.

The replacement itself is not complicated for most solutions, although there are some that require a few gymnastics. For example, XP has a battery built inside the probe, which brings the problem of cutting the resin and refilling it after changing it. Fortunately, there are kits with instructions and there is nothing to worry about if we have a minimum of motor skills.

At the very end, the type of removable batteries. It’s not an easy topic. The market is full of substitutes. The simple rule is only branded and from proven sellers. Cheap cells do not work or only work for a while and fail at the worst possible moment. It is also important to check whether the device will work well with the batteries. They have a slightly lower operating voltage (they last for a shorter time than alkaline ones) and the electronics can play tricks on us, incorrectly signaling the moment of discharge. Strange behavior, and lack of stability of work and ranges are also not uncommon in such a situation. It is worth checking in the documentation attached to the detector what can and cannot be done.

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